Chapter 2: How to Make Landing Pages Work for Your Small Business?

One of the most important metrics that marketers track is engagement. Whether you want to call it on-ground marketing or experiential marketing, it is intended to bring customers into the company experience.

landing pages for any business

Engagement is all about interactivity: like this Facebook status, share this tweet, repost this picture, follow this company, subscribe to our newsletter.

From a customer’s perspective, engaging with your company shouldn’t be a chore. There has to be something they get out of the deal, too. It can be exclusive offers, freebies, or other rewards for their loyalty.

If you’re not engaging with your customers, it’s time to start now. Landing pages are one of the easiest ways to drive engagement to your business. Whether you’re an inexperienced small business owner still learning about marketing or a seasoned pro looking for new strategies, this second chapter is for you. We’re going to cover how to make landing pages work for your business.

More Landing Page types for businesses

In Chapter 1, we discussed categories of landing pages. These included the homepage as a landing page, product detail landing pages, lead generation landing pages, and click-through landing pages. These are all essentials that you should utilize as a business owner.

free business landing pages

Besides those landing page types, you should also look at making pages for these elements.

Pay-Per Click Landing Pages

Pay-per-click (PPC) advertising means you’re spending money for your advertisement only when a lead or customer engages with it. These ads will still appear across the Internet, including apps, websites, social media, and search engines.

You already know from reading Chapter 1 that most leads who arrive on your landing page have clicked an ad they saw somewhere online. Many marketers prefer their PPC ads to redirect leads to a landing page for more conversions.

If you want to do the same, you might use advertising platforms across many social media sites like Reddit, Twitter, and Facebook.

Google Ads is also worth considering if you have a segmented, niche audience interested in specific keywords.

Affiliate Marketing Landing Page

Another marketing segment for businesses is affiliate marketers. These marketers receive deals and freebies from retailers. In exchange, they have to recommend said retailer to their audience. These referrals benefit all parties involved.

Some people have mixed feelings about affiliate marketing. If you do practice it, be sure to be upfront about your involvement. That should be enough to address any negative comments from your visitors.

How do you relate affiliate marketing to landing pages? That’s a good question. You might make a resources page as a landing page that introduces potential customers to your product, service, or even the industry. Along the way, you might redirect leads to other relevant pages that include even more resources. Doing so allows you to get more commissions when people purchase your products or services.

Besides a resource page, you might make what’s known as a long-form squeeze landing page. This is a page in which you showcase a single product and a mini-website just for that product. This mini-website is on a single landing page with just one URL.

A well-designed long-form squeeze landing page should include strong sales copy, reviews, testimonials, pictures, and even videos.

Landing Pages for promoting events

event landing page design

Do you have a live event you’re planning for your company's brand? Maybe it’s a product launch, a webinar, a speech, or an expo. Regardless of what it is, you can still use landing pages to inform and build up hype about your upcoming event.

For instance, if you are going to appear at an expo or other marketing event, you might make a landing page specifically to drive ticket sales. All you have to do is write a few paragraphs about the event and then add a button for leads to purchase tickets. If you’re accepting registrations for an event, you can do something similar.

You can also use a landing page with a countdown timer if you’re planning a live webinar or product launch.

Regardless of which type of events you promote on a landing page, you want your page to have plenty of engaging media types. Images and video give people a feel for the event and entice to participate.

Landing Pages for Content Marketing

If you need more leads, then you might make a lead generation landing page as we outlined in Chapter 1. What if that page isn’t converting as well as you wanted? In that case, you might want a landing page that is heavy on content marketing

Just as a refresher - content marketing is defined as use of written blog content (often long-form content) to engage with your audience and drive sales and traffic. Readers can share the post on social media and instant messengers. They can engage by writing comments as well.

content rich landing page

The best content marketing will get readers interested in your products and services, and maybe even ready to buy. Of course, all content does not need to be sales-y; remember, this is not a sales page.

Your main goal with content marketing should always be delivering value to your readers. That value might be to inform them, educate them, or make them think. It will vary depending on your industry and niche. If you’re not sure what kinds of posts are working best for you, then look back on your past posts to see which ones drove the most traffic. Then emulate them.

Our last point on content marketing is the need for it to be relevant while also timeless. Many marketers talk about evergreen content, which means writing and posting only the most up-to-the-minute content available. If you’re writing about time-sensitive issues, you will have to go back and update these posts regularly so they’re as relevant as possible.

How to optimize your business landing pages to drive more engagement

Now that you know which types of landing pages you might want to implement for your business, you may wonder how to optimize these pages to drive conversion, sales, and leads. The elements you should include will vary from one type of landing page to another.

landing page optimization

In Chapter 1, we mentioned crucial landing page elements such as strong copy, social proof, a call to action or CTA button, a benefits list, and a unique selling proposition. In addition to those elements, you might also think of adding the following:

  • A privacy policy: If you are looking for lead generation especially, a privacy policy is a must. Today, a person’s privacy data sells at a premium price. You only have to look at the 2018 Facebook breach and its ramifications to understand how much the average person (your potential customer) values their privacy. A privacy policy clearly spells out your intentions with a lead’s personal information. You should take special care to mention how you don’t plan on reselling this data to third parties.
  • A lead capture form: For most of the business landing page types we mentioned, the goal is to either get the lead to subscribe or to buy. You can’t do this without a lead capture form. You should try to keep this form as simple and straightforward as possible. The more contact information you seek, the more you’ll discourage your lead to fill out the form. Make sure your privacy policy is highlighted on your lead capture form.
  • Headlines and subheadings: While we did touch on sales copy in Chapter 1, we did not discuss the importance of headlines and subheadings. It ultimately comes down to aesthetics. If you had to read a 500-word article, would you rather digest it as a block of text or paragraphs divided by subheadings? We all know the answer is the latter. Your headline should also be clear and short. Don’t promise what you can’t deliver. Don’t try to make your offers seem too good to be true. Keep your headline informative, honest, and helpful.
  • As little navigation as possible: Earlier in this chapter, we mentioned how affiliate marketing landing pages might look like mini websites unto themselves. This is the only time your landing page should look like that. Otherwise, you want to keep it as simple as possible, with no sidebars or top navigation bars. You want your lead to click through, subscribe, and buy. Anything making that goal more difficult to achieve—such as complicated navigation—is a drawback for your landing page.

Conclusion

As a business owner, you should be aware of landing pages that deal with affiliate marketing, content marketing, PPC, and event promotion. These pages drive engagement, and increase leads and sales for your company.

To optimize your business landing pages, it’s recommended to add a lead capture form, privacy policy, and clear headlines and subheadings. You should also refrain from complicated navigation that makes it too hard for a lead to find their way around the page.

The look of your landing page is also incredibly important. In Chapter 3, we are going to discuss landing page templates and how to choose one that will help you meet your business goals.

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